Tag Archives: SMOKE POINTS

SMOKE POINTS of Cooking Oil: A general summary about seasoning

How does this work? As oil bakes past the smoke points, it leaves a black patina finish, (carbon).  This carbon is polymerize as the oil is seared onto the cookware through the process of heating at a high temperature.  Once the oil has burned away, it will leave this finish known as seasoning.  Many manufactures preseason cookware but in time, re seasoning may be required. Once the oil has been heated, it is cooked into the surface of the item and when cooled, the first level of patina finish remains and once cooled will have a smooth touch.  Over time, through use, more oils are added while cooking and when kept properly, only gets better through time.  

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Over time, through use, more oils are added while cooking and when kept properly, only gets better through time.  

What oils work best?  Cooking oils whether vegetable or animal fat both work.  I have used different oils over time seasoning many different types of cast iron cookware with great results, but only oils at or above 350 degrees (f) seem to work best.  I like bacon grease, although vegetable oils work fine and as I often cook using olive oil,  it too, works great.   What you use, truly is up to what you like and use in your home. What perhaps is more important in selecting what oil you use, is deciding which not to choose.  Since most cooking is around 350 degrees (f), do not select a Low smoke points oil.  many will argue bacon grease over vegetable oil, or coconut oil over cottonseed, but truth is, they all work as they are all higher smoke points.   While Avocado and Coconut (refine) have the highest smoke points, any oil with 350 degrees (f) will provide a sufficient finish. If the item comes out sticky, just reheat and cool again as most often, a sticky finish is because you either did not reach smoke point or did not heat long enough.

Smoke Point Chart

Fat Smoke Point °F Smoke Point °C
Unrefined canola oil 225°F 107°C
Unrefined flax seed oil 225°F 107°C
Unrefined safflower oil 225°F 107°C
Unrefined sunflower oil 225°F 107°C
Unrefined corn oil 320°F 160°C
Unrefined high-oleic sunflower oil 320°F 160°C
Extra virgin olive oil 320°F 160°C
Unrefined peanut oil 320°F 160°C
Semi refined safflower oil 320°F 160°C
Unrefined soy oil 320°F 160°C
Unrefined walnut oil 320°F 160°C
Hemp seed oil 330°F 165°C
Butter 350°F 177°C
Semi refined canola oil 350°F 177°C
Coconut oil 350°F 177°C
Unrefined sesame oil 350°F 177°C
Semi refined soy oil 350°F 177°C
Vegetable shortening 360°F 182°C
Lard 370°F 182°C
Macadamia nut oil 390°F 199°C
Refined canola oil 400°F 204°C
Semi refined walnut oil 400°F 204°C
High quality (low acidity) extra virgin olive oil 405°F 207°C
Sesame oil 410°F 210°C
Cottonseed oil 420°F 216°C
Grape seed oil 420°F 216°C
Virgin olive oil 420°F 216°C
Almond oil 420°F 216°C
Hazelnut oil 430°F 221°C
Peanut oil 440°F 227°C
Sunflower oil 440°F 227°C
Refined corn oil 450°F 232°C
Palm oil 450°F 232°C
Palm kernel oil 450°F 232°C
Refined high-oleic sunflower oil 450°F 232°C
Refined peanut oil 450°F 232°C
Refined Safflower oil 450°F 232°C
Semi refined sesame oil 450°F 232°C
Refined soy oil 450°F 232°C
Semi refined Sunflower Oil 450°F 232°C
Olive pomace Oil 460°F 238°C
Extra light olive Oil 468°F 242°C
Soybean oil 495°F 257°C
Safflower oil 510°F 266°C
Avocado oil 520°F 271°C

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