God’s Of The Cast Iron

How Do You Season You Cast Iron Pan

The age old question when it comes to seasoning cast iron pan’s, what do you use?  of course everyone will have there version.   So let’s all see who season’s there Cast Iron arsenal with what.



Also make sure to also check out these page’s


|How To Season Cast IronSeasoning With Beeswax | Cast Iron Beeswax Bars|


 

Cast Iron Composition

Cast Iron Banner

The primary difference in production between wrought iron and cast iron is that cast iron is not worked with hammers and tools. There are also differences in composition— Cast iron, an alloy of iron that contains 2 to 4 percent carbon, along with varying amounts of silicon and manganese and traces of impurities such as sulfur and phosphorus. It is made by reducing iron ore in a blast furnace.


COMPOSITION

  • All cast irons contain more than 2% C.

  • Cast iron is the alloy of carbon with 1.7 to 4.5%

  • Carbon and 0.5 to 3% silicon.

  • But in some alloy it has Manganese 0.5 to

  • 1.0%, Phosphorous 0.1 to 0.9 %, & Sulphur

  • 0.07 to 0.10%.


A few common mechanical properties for cast iron include: Hardness – material’s resistance to abrasion and indentation. Toughness – material’s ability to absorb energy.
Ductility – material’s ability to deform without fracture.

Check Out This Video



Reading Material 

  1. [PDF] Cast Iron: History and Application

  2. [PPT] Metallurgical Properties of Cast Irons 

  3. [PDF] Grey Cast Iron Composition

  4. [PDF] Cast Iron – Materials Education


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SMOKE POINTS of Cooking Oil: A general summary about seasoning

How does this work? As oil bakes past the smoke points, it leaves a black patina finish, (carbon).  This carbon is polymerize as the oil is seared onto the cookware through the process of heating at a high temperature.  Once the oil has burned away, it will leave this finish known as seasoning.  Many manufactures preseason cookware but in time, re seasoning may be required. Once the oil has been heated, it is cooked into the surface of the item and when cooled, the first level of patina finish remains and once cooled will have a smooth touch.  Over time, through use, more oils are added while cooking and when kept properly, only gets better through time.  

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Over time, through use, more oils are added while cooking and when kept properly, only gets better through time.  

What oils work best?  Cooking oils whether vegetable or animal fat both work.  I have used different oils over time seasoning many different types of cast iron cookware with great results, but only oils at or above 350 degrees (f) seem to work best.  I like bacon grease, although vegetable oils work fine and as I often cook using olive oil,  it too, works great.   What you use, truly is up to what you like and use in your home. What perhaps is more important in selecting what oil you use, is deciding which not to choose.  Since most cooking is around 350 degrees (f), do not select a Low smoke points oil.  many will argue bacon grease over vegetable oil, or coconut oil over cottonseed, but truth is, they all work as they are all higher smoke points.   While Avocado and Coconut (refine) have the highest smoke points, any oil with 350 degrees (f) will provide a sufficient finish. If the item comes out sticky, just reheat and cool again as most often, a sticky finish is because you either did not reach smoke point or did not heat long enough.

Smoke Point Chart

Fat Smoke Point °F Smoke Point °C
Unrefined canola oil 225°F 107°C
Unrefined flax seed oil 225°F 107°C
Unrefined safflower oil 225°F 107°C
Unrefined sunflower oil 225°F 107°C
Unrefined corn oil 320°F 160°C
Unrefined high-oleic sunflower oil 320°F 160°C
Extra virgin olive oil 320°F 160°C
Unrefined peanut oil 320°F 160°C
Semi refined safflower oil 320°F 160°C
Unrefined soy oil 320°F 160°C
Unrefined walnut oil 320°F 160°C
Hemp seed oil 330°F 165°C
Butter 350°F 177°C
Semi refined canola oil 350°F 177°C
Coconut oil 350°F 177°C
Unrefined sesame oil 350°F 177°C
Semi refined soy oil 350°F 177°C
Vegetable shortening 360°F 182°C
Lard 370°F 182°C
Macadamia nut oil 390°F 199°C
Refined canola oil 400°F 204°C
Semi refined walnut oil 400°F 204°C
High quality (low acidity) extra virgin olive oil 405°F 207°C
Sesame oil 410°F 210°C
Cottonseed oil 420°F 216°C
Grape seed oil 420°F 216°C
Virgin olive oil 420°F 216°C
Almond oil 420°F 216°C
Hazelnut oil 430°F 221°C
Peanut oil 440°F 227°C
Sunflower oil 440°F 227°C
Refined corn oil 450°F 232°C
Palm oil 450°F 232°C
Palm kernel oil 450°F 232°C
Refined high-oleic sunflower oil 450°F 232°C
Refined peanut oil 450°F 232°C
Refined Safflower oil 450°F 232°C
Semi refined sesame oil 450°F 232°C
Refined soy oil 450°F 232°C
Semi refined Sunflower Oil 450°F 232°C
Olive pomace Oil 460°F 238°C
Extra light olive Oil 468°F 242°C
Soybean oil 495°F 257°C
Safflower oil 510°F 266°C
Avocado oil 520°F 271°C

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Some Cast Iron Basic’s

The Basics

A few simple guidelines can help ease the learning curve for the new user of cast iron cookware:

Preheating your cast iron skillet in the oven will prevent the centre hot spot which can occur when simply preheating on a burner. When a very hot pan is required, this method is preferred as it avoids the kind of damage which can occur to an empty pan over a very hot burner. If you must preheat to high over a burner, start low and increase the heat in increments a few minutes apart.

A long as you add heat energy, cast iron will continue to get hotter. A pan heated to high for searing or frying should have the heat reduced to medium during cooking to avoid overcooking, burning or sticking.

Cast iron reacts slowly to cooking temperature changes; raising or reducing burner or oven temp will not have an immediate effect. Learning to anticipate when critical temperature changes will be necessary is therefore a valuable part of variable temperature cooking in cast iron.

When increasing from low to medium, one technique is to first set the burner to high for a short interval in order to add heat more quickly, and then back it down to medium.

When needing to lower cooking temp, remove the pan from the burner altogether for an interval before returning it to the burner reduced to the desired lower setting. Or consider using two pans, one warm and one hot, for temperature critical situations, and move the food between them.

Newly refurbished, manually seasoned pans will not yet possess their best non-stick properties; use a little extra oil or butter for the first several cooks.