WHAT EXACTLY IS PROCESSED FOOD ANYWAY?

rabbit chocolate

Photo by Giftpundits.com on Pexels.com

If it’s boxed, bagged, canned or jarred and has a list of ingredients on the label, it’s processed. Methods used to process foods include:

  • Canning

  • Freezing

  • Refrigeration

  • Dehydration

  • Aseptic Processing

Processed foods have been altered from their natural state for “safety” and convenience reasons. And scary as it seems, about 90 percent of the money that Americans spend on food is used to buy processed items.

List Of Processed Food

Processed Fruits & Vegetables

Yes, even fruits and vegetables these days are being processed and sold.  Here are a few examples of processed fruits & vegetables:

  • Canned Fruits

  • Canned Vegetables

  • Frozen Fruits

  • Frozen Vegetables

  • French Fries

  • Ketchup

  • Pie Fillings

  • Jams & Jellies

  • Fruit Juice

  • Vegetable Juice

  • Tomato Soup

  • Tomato Pasta Sauce

  • Potato Chips

  • Corn Chips

  • Dried Fruits

  • Dried Vegetables

Processed Meats

Meat is a healthy part of most diets, but all too often they are processed and packaged to make them more convenient.  Check out these examples of processed meats:

  • Canned Meats (SPAM, Most Tuna Fish, etc)

  • Cured Meats (Lunch meats)

  • Ham

  • Sausage

  • Bacon

  • Some Frozen Meats

  • Gelatin

  • Chicken Nuggets

  • Most Pre-Cooked Meats

  • Cured Meats

  • Bologna

Processed Baked Goods

Baked goods are almost always processed when found in the supermarket.  Occasionally you will find freshly baked options but even those may have processed ingredients so make sure you ask how they were prepared before buying.

  • White Rice

  • Flour

  • Bread

  • Rolls

  • Buns

  • Bagels

  • Bread Sticks

  • Pizza Crusts

  • Taco Shells

  • Muffins

  • Macaroni

  • Pasta

  • Cake (and Cake Mixes)

  • Pie Crusts

  • Cookies

  • Pop Tarts (and similar foods)

  • Doughnuts

  • Pastries

Fast (Convenient) Foods

This is the one category where most people know that the foods are processed.  Despite this, however, they are still extremely popular.

  • Pizza Rolls

  • Microwave Pizza

  • Frozen Dinners

  • Granola Bars (and bagged granola)

  • Almost all Energy Bars

  • Protein Bars

  • Jalapeno Poppers

  • Microwave Tacos

  • Microwave Burritos

  • Raman Noodles

  • Most Canned Soups

  • Roasted & Salted Nuts

Dairy Foods

Dairy is another category where most people don’t realise that these foods are processed.  There are some items in this category that can be part of a healthy diet, but keeping the processing to a minimum is a good practice.

  • Cheeses

  • Cheese Foods

  • Milk (In some areas you can get raw milk, which is not processed)

  • Yogurt

  • Kiefer

  • Cream Cheese

Snack Foods

Snack foods are typically going to be heavily processed and should always be avoided completely or at least minimise as much as possible.

  • White Sugar

  • Brown Sugar

  • Powdered Sugar

  • Corn Syrup

  • Rice Syrup

  • Pudding

  • Soft Candies

  • Marshmallows

  • Caramel

  • Honey (You can buy raw honey, which is not processed)

  • Ice Cream

  • Whipped Cream

  • Chocolate

  • Shredded Coconut (You can buy unprocessed coconut in some areas, which is not processed)

  • Sugar Substituted (Equal, Sweet & Low, etc)

  • Maple Syrup

  • Hard Candy

Processed Beverages

Drinks, other than water, are almost always going to be processed in the supermarket. If you want to drink something unprocessed, consider juicing your own fruit at home.

  • Apple Juice

  • Orange Juice

  • Grape Juice

  • Grapefruit Juice

  • Cranberry Juice

  • Juice Flavored Drinks

  • All Soda

  • Instant Breakfasts

  • Flavored Waters

  • Coffee (you can buy raw coffee, which is unprocessed)

  • Tea (You can buy raw tea, which is unprocessed)

Oils, Fats, Salts & More

Oils, fats, and other products are typically going to be processed.

  • Cooking Spray

  • Margarine

  • Salad Dressings

  • BBQ Sauce

  • Most Seed Oils

  • Refined Oils

  • Peanut Butter

  • Cashew Butter

  • Mayonnaise

  • Soy Sauce

  • Vegetable Oils


Pork Roast It’s Whats For Dinner

Pork Roast

  • Servings: 6
  • Difficulty: easy

A pork loin is marinated with a nice rub flavored with thyme and three chilies.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 Cup Brown Sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon Coarsely Ground Black Pepper
  • 1 Tablespoon kosher salt
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon dry mustard powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
  • 1 (2 1/2 pound) boneless pork loin roast

Directions

  1. Mix brown sugar, pepper, salt, garlic powder, mustard powder, ground ginger, onion powder, red pepper flakes, cayenne pepper, cumin, paprika, and thyme in a bowl. Rub spice mixture over pork loin and wrap tightly in plastic wrap. Place pork on a 9×13-inch baking dish and refrigerate for 4 hours to overnight.
  2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Remove plastic wrap from pork and discard; return pork to baking dish.
  3. Bake in the preheated oven until pork is slightly pink in the center, about 50 minutes. An instant-read thermometer inserted into the center should read at least 145 degrees F (63 degrees C). Cover pork loosely with aluminum foil and let rest for 10 minutes before slicing.




“The Best Thing Since Sliced Bread”

Meaning: It’s A Big DealHoly Sliced Bread


When a Commercial Bread Slicer hit the market in 1928, it was a very big deal. To be perfectly clear, mankind has had the ability to  cut bread for a long time. It’s not as if people just grabbed whole loaves and gnawed on them like apples for 6,000 years until 1928. But up until that point, people had to slice their own bread.

It became a mechanised process, with uniformly shaped and sliced loaves, and bags of sliced bread became a staple in American households in the 1930’s. The phrase itself probably comes from a Wonder Bread Ad Campaign. The Atlantic wrote a whole story all about this one.



Read These Links

  1. Bread Slicer History – Invention of the Bread Slicer

  2. 41 Catchy Bread Slogans & Taglines


 


Cast Iron Composition

Cast Iron Banner

The primary difference in production between wrought iron and cast iron is that cast iron is not worked with hammers and tools. There are also differences in composition— Cast iron, an alloy of iron that contains 2 to 4 percent carbon, along with varying amounts of silicon and manganese and traces of impurities such as sulfur and phosphorus. It is made by reducing iron ore in a blast furnace.


COMPOSITION

  • All cast irons contain more than 2% C.

  • Cast iron is the alloy of carbon with 1.7 to 4.5%

  • Carbon and 0.5 to 3% silicon.

  • But in some alloy it has Manganese 0.5 to

  • 1.0%, Phosphorous 0.1 to 0.9 %, & Sulphur

  • 0.07 to 0.10%.


A few common mechanical properties for cast iron include: Hardness – material’s resistance to abrasion and indentation. Toughness – material’s ability to absorb energy.
Ductility – material’s ability to deform without fracture.

Check Out This Video



Reading Material 

  1. [PDF] Cast Iron: History and Application

  2. [PPT] Metallurgical Properties of Cast Irons 

  3. [PDF] Grey Cast Iron Composition

  4. [PDF] Cast Iron – Materials Education


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11 Pretentious Food Terms


One of the biggest complaints people have with the food industry is the pretentious attitude.  The food world is full of people and establishments who reek of self-importance. We’ve developed a culinary lexicon that has become so convoluted, The gastro-glossary of words around the word is long and often confusing with many kitchen terms that chefs fully understand confusing their customers when they hit the menus in the dining room.


1.Hand-anything – hand-chopped, hand-pulled, hand-cut, hand-glazed…

Wow. What an ingenious method. So ingenious in fact that every grandma since the dawn of civilisation has been using this innovative method to prepare food.

2. Artisanal

So over-used, it’s losing its meaning. I mean, if every bakery down the road calls itself “Artisanal”, which really sounds more like “I’m just starting out, don’t have the funds or the time to do more than this”, then where is the line drawn between a true artisan and a wannabe?

3. Bespoke

Custom-crafted cocktails, madam? Yeah, and that $30 price tag that comes along with it. It’s all right. I’ll stick to that glass of boring wine.

4. Deconstructed

Oh, the things you learn from Master Chef. Here I was thinking that “Deconstructed” dishes meant the creator thought of a concept BEFORE he started plating the dish. But in reality, it seems like deconstructed is just a convenient term for when things start going awry in the cooking or plating process!

5. Foraged

Ok, yes so maybe those darn Chanterelle Mushrooms were really foraged from some forest in Scandinavia but, I’m not quite sure how to react when I see foraged items in urban city centres. Maybe I shouldn’t diss that poor weed growing out of the asphalt streets, after all.

Oh, how “lucky” am I that there are at least 5 artisanal bakeries in my neighbourhood – so I can learn essential skills in life, like being able to tell the difference between a fougasse and a flatkaka

Yes, and please charge me $30 for that alcohol-infused bespoke strawberry smoothie

What lovely mushrooms growing in the grass patch next to my car park. I wonder if I should forage for them?

6. Curated

We get it. You studied the fine arts of vegetables and have personally “Curated” what should appear on my plate. Heaven forbid, that damn carrot ruining the verdant look of lush forest greens.

7. Chef’s Menu or Omakase

This isn’t so much about the words Chef’s Menu or Omakase. It’s the way the staff hold on to the information about what’s on the menu with secrecy befitting the CIA.

Yes, it is a damn secret, I know. But really, I am already sitting at your restaurant, willing to splash out the moolah, so what’s up with not telling me even as I order the Chef’s Menu about what I am getting? Yes, they ask you about allergies and there’s always religious considerations. But what if you don’t have any of those restrictions but you just don’t really, really like a particular food? Like you may love some bacon bits in your appetiser but you absolutely cannot handle a full-on pork belly for a main. Do you just blanket tell them you don’t eat pork and miss out on trying other dishes of theirs?

8. No-description menus

You know, the ones that read like this – Beef|Pearls|Citrus and you’re like what?? What am I ordering, guys?

9. Giving me a geography lesson I do not need

Like telling me that the line-caught fish is from Moldova or something. Wait, do they even fish in Moldova? 

10. Giving me a French lesson that, again, I do not need

Yes, it’s a beautiful language where even saying “you’re a bloody ass of a cook” sounds so fancy, but it’s OK. You can still call a mashed potato a mashed potato and if it’s the silkiest, creamiest mash I have ever eaten, I will not care that it wasn’t a pomme puree.

11. Mouthfeel

Only usually ever uttered by the most pretentious wannabes, it’s meant to tell the rest of us plebeians that really, you are using ALL your senses when you dine. Clever girl.

Would this be more interesting if I said it was a locally-harvested Tiger Prawns, accompanied by hand-tossed gluten-free pasta in a prawn head organic chilli oil?

Curated puffs of delight, swimming in hand-pulled milk from a free range, organic bovine farm from the Scottish Highlands

“Oh, the mouthfeel of a Dragon Fruit”, she exclaimed, sighing with pleasure. Oh, did you mean you like the way the seeds pop in your mouth, say like, fizzy pop candy?



Bring Home The Bacon

Meaning: Go earn money

This one has many interpretations. Some believe it started in a tradition in Dunmow England where the Dunmow Flitch was given every four years to a couple who impressed the town through their strength of fidelity. The prize? A big ol’ side of bacon.

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However most believe the term derives from a 1906 lightweight boxing title match with Joe Gans. Bacon was a slang term for your body (and by extension your livelihood or income) since the 1700’s. Joe’s mother told her son before the fight, “Joe the eyes of the world are on you. Everybody says you ought to win. Peter Jackson will tell me the news and you bring home the bacon.” This quote was published in The New York Times, and caught on, creating one of the tastiest expressions ever.


SMOKE POINTS of Cooking Oil: A general summary about seasoning

How does this work? As oil bakes past the smoke points, it leaves a black patina finish, (carbon).  This carbon is polymerize as the oil is seared onto the cookware through the process of heating at a high temperature.  Once the oil has burned away, it will leave this finish known as seasoning.  Many manufactures preseason cookware but in time, re seasoning may be required. Once the oil has been heated, it is cooked into the surface of the item and when cooled, the first level of patina finish remains and once cooled will have a smooth touch.  Over time, through use, more oils are added while cooking and when kept properly, only gets better through time.  

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Over time, through use, more oils are added while cooking and when kept properly, only gets better through time.  

What oils work best?  Cooking oils whether vegetable or animal fat both work.  I have used different oils over time seasoning many different types of cast iron cookware with great results, but only oils at or above 350 degrees (f) seem to work best.  I like bacon grease, although vegetable oils work fine and as I often cook using olive oil,  it too, works great.   What you use, truly is up to what you like and use in your home. What perhaps is more important in selecting what oil you use, is deciding which not to choose.  Since most cooking is around 350 degrees (f), do not select a Low smoke points oil.  many will argue bacon grease over vegetable oil, or coconut oil over cottonseed, but truth is, they all work as they are all higher smoke points.   While Avocado and Coconut (refine) have the highest smoke points, any oil with 350 degrees (f) will provide a sufficient finish. If the item comes out sticky, just reheat and cool again as most often, a sticky finish is because you either did not reach smoke point or did not heat long enough.

Smoke Point Chart

Fat Smoke Point °F Smoke Point °C
Unrefined canola oil 225°F 107°C
Unrefined flax seed oil 225°F 107°C
Unrefined safflower oil 225°F 107°C
Unrefined sunflower oil 225°F 107°C
Unrefined corn oil 320°F 160°C
Unrefined high-oleic sunflower oil 320°F 160°C
Extra virgin olive oil 320°F 160°C
Unrefined peanut oil 320°F 160°C
Semi refined safflower oil 320°F 160°C
Unrefined soy oil 320°F 160°C
Unrefined walnut oil 320°F 160°C
Hemp seed oil 330°F 165°C
Butter 350°F 177°C
Semi refined canola oil 350°F 177°C
Coconut oil 350°F 177°C
Unrefined sesame oil 350°F 177°C
Semi refined soy oil 350°F 177°C
Vegetable shortening 360°F 182°C
Lard 370°F 182°C
Macadamia nut oil 390°F 199°C
Refined canola oil 400°F 204°C
Semi refined walnut oil 400°F 204°C
High quality (low acidity) extra virgin olive oil 405°F 207°C
Sesame oil 410°F 210°C
Cottonseed oil 420°F 216°C
Grape seed oil 420°F 216°C
Virgin olive oil 420°F 216°C
Almond oil 420°F 216°C
Hazelnut oil 430°F 221°C
Peanut oil 440°F 227°C
Sunflower oil 440°F 227°C
Refined corn oil 450°F 232°C
Palm oil 450°F 232°C
Palm kernel oil 450°F 232°C
Refined high-oleic sunflower oil 450°F 232°C
Refined peanut oil 450°F 232°C
Refined Safflower oil 450°F 232°C
Semi refined sesame oil 450°F 232°C
Refined soy oil 450°F 232°C
Semi refined Sunflower Oil 450°F 232°C
Olive pomace Oil 460°F 238°C
Extra light olive Oil 468°F 242°C
Soybean oil 495°F 257°C
Safflower oil 510°F 266°C
Avocado oil 520°F 271°C

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A Quick Science Lesson

Chalkboard

Let’s stop and think about what food is for a moment.  Food is organic material, coming from either Plants, Animals, or Fungus.  Meat comes from a slaughtered animal that has been dissected piece by piece and ground up into hamburger meat or dipped in batter to later be fried. Vegetables grow right up out of manure from the ground. Mushrooms are, in fact, a fungus.

Food is inherently unsanitary. Food comes from once-living things that have been harvested, taken apart and repackaged in hopes of arriving at their final destination before decomposition sets in.

In short, food is kind of gross when you think about it, and it can get even grosser if you don’t know how to properly prepare, store and cook it.

Of course, the point we’re trying to make here isn’t just that food starts out icky, but rather, that health concerns should be of the highest priority when working in the food industry.

The fact is that food is not merely prone to come in contact with germs and parasites and the like, but that food is inherently tainted. Food inherently carries bacteria and other pathogens. Keeping food safe for your customers or dinner guests is not a matter of preventing the food from coming into contact with germs, but of keeping those germs to a minimum, killing bacteria through freezing and cooking processes, and in keeping the food as safe and healthy as possible.

The bottom line is that, every time you eat anything, you are ingesting potentially harmful bacteria and all sorts of other nasties, but, fortunately, the human immune system is quite capable of dealing with E. coli or salmonella… in small doses, at least.

With this in mind, we give you…

A Brief Lesson in Pathogens

We’ll begin with a brief definition of a pathogen-

A pathogen, or a germ, is identified as being a biological agent capable of causing disease or illness to its host.

The body itself is capable of defending against common pathogens by way of the human immune system, as well as through helpful bacteria which occur in the human body’s normal flora However, should this defence system, either the human immune system or helpful bacteria be damaged in any way, such as through chemotherapy, HIV, or antibiotics (often taken to kill existing pathogens), then pathogenic bacteria or viruses can easily infect, proliferate and, in some cases, become terminal.

The fact is that every pathogen is capable of killing its host. Without a defence system in place, there is nothing to keep bacteria from simply eating and eating away at the host without cease.

A number of pathogens, such as Yersinia pestis, believed to have been the cause of the Black Plague, and the Malaria protozoa, have been responsible for casualties on a massive scale.

Types of Pathogen

Pathogens can be either viral, bacterial, fungal or pr ionic.

Viral pathogens generally fall into the families of:

· Adenovirida

· Herpesviridae

· Hepadnaviridae

· Flaviviridae

· Picomaviridae

· Retroviridae

· Orthomyxoviridae

· Paramyxoviridae

· Papovaviridae

· Rhabdoviridae or

· Togaviridae.

Notable viral pathogens include smallpox, influenza, measles, chickenpox, Ebola, the mumps and rubella.

Interestingly, the vast majority of bacterial pathogens are either harmless or, in fact, beneficial, but there are those that can lead to infectious disease. The most common bacterial disease is T.B., or tuberculosis, which is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a bacteria which affects about two million people, with the majority being in sub-Saharan Africa.

The most common strains of food borne bacterial pathogen include shigella, campylobacter and salmonella. Pathogenic bacteria can cause infections including tetanus, typhoid fever, diphtheria, syphilis and even leprosy (though this is hardly common in the 21st Century). Bacterial infections are generally dealt with by way of antibiotics.

Fungal pathogens are capable of causing disease in humans, animals and even plants. This type of pathogen typically infects immuno-compromised people or vulnerable individuals with weakened immune systems. The majority of antibiotics cannot be used to treat fungal infections as fungi and their hosts both have eukaryotic cells.

A prion is a pathogen that does not contain nucleic acids. Associated conditions include Mad Cow Disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease.

Transmission

Pathogens can be transmitted in several ways. Here we’ll deal with airborne, blood borne and food borne pathogens.

Blood borne pathogens are not necessarily transmitted strictly through contact with blood, but can also be transmitted through other bodily fluids such as saliva, mucus and tears.

Airborne pathogens are those which are transmitted through the air. This can include those transmitted through sneezing, coughing, or simply those drifting in the air.

Not to alarm you, but the air you breath is literally packed with all sorts of bacteria and other substances, including, but not limited to, dead skin flakes and microscopic bits of faecal matter. There is simply no getting away from airborne pathogens. While more extreme measures of controlling airborne pathogens may be put in place in places such as hospitals and treatment centres, the primary method for dealing with airborne pathogens is simply in ensuring that they do not cause infection.

The truth is that food will come into contact with pathogens, and so, proper cooking and clean hands are a requisite in keeping these pathogens from spreading and causing infection or disease.

Food borne pathogens are those which are, of course, transmitted through food.

Understanding Salmonella

The chief offender with regards to salmonella would be, of course, poultry. Typically, poultry contracts salmonella due to unhygienic thawing methods. It is of course common to use ice water to thaw chicken, but using, say, warm water, instead, can easily attract bacteria and cause it to multiply. This is because the melt water contains condensation from the chicken, which proves to be a literal Petri dish for the minuscule amount of the bacteria already in the water.

This same principle applies to all other foods, as well. Unclean food, food not prepared to the proper temperatures, food left out for too long are all breeding grounds for the minuscule amounts of salmonella in the water and air to thrive and multiply.

E. Coli

E. Coli, or Escherichia Coli, is a gram negative bacterium most commonly found in the lower intestine of warm blooded animals. The majority of E. Coli strains are, perhaps surprisingly, harmless. Several other strains, however, can be responsible for serious food poisoning in humans.

The harmless strains of E. Coli are actually a part of the normal flora of the human gut and can actually benefit the host by producing vitamin K, as well as preventing the establishment of pathogenic bacteria within the intestine.

E. Coli can typically only survive outside of the body for brief periods of time, however, food that has not been prepared properly makes for a fertile breeding ground for the bacteria, and should infection occur, serious and life threatening complications can possibly take place.

The Severity of the Situation

As mentioned above, pathogens are everywhere. They’re in every meal you eat, they thrive on your hands and they’re in the air you’re breathing right now. It’s simply a fact of life that germs are everywhere, even on Mars (if those fossils recovered in the mid-nineties are to be believed).

The importance of serving safe and hygienic food, then, is quite a priority. We can never ensure that the food that we serve is one hundred percent free of pathogens, but we can, fortunately, make sure that those pathogens are kept to safe enough levels that the average individuals immune system will be able to efficiently deal with any germs that come in contact with the body.

Here we will emphasise the number one point…

Wash your Hands

c4577-2a3602_de0b6f24c2e448fcb3a6160c6ee76830mv2We’ll warn you here and now that you should expect us to “get on our high horse” about this one a few more times before this text is finished. The fact is that keeping your hands clean is the absolute number one best method for preventing the spread of pathogens in a kitchen environment.  Keep your hands clean, apply latex gloves any time you need to come in direct contact with food, and your battle with food borne pathogens is already half-won.

Link’s

  1. Canadian Partnership for Consumer Food Safety Education 

  2. Food Safety Network 

  3. Foodservice and Hospitality Magazine 

  4. Health Canada 



Bird’s Saliva Is An Expensive Delicacy

 

Let’s forget Caviar and those expensive Truffles, bird’s saliva is the food of the well-heeled, at least in China anyway. Bird’s nest soup, is an expensive delicacy made from rare bird’s nests created from the saliva of small swiftlets. The nests, which have been used in Chinese cooking for over four centuries, are dissolved in water to make a soup which is believed to have exquisite flavour and be of benefit to health. These bird nests are considered to be one of the most expensive animal food products consumed by humans.   

A single bowl of it costs between $30 and $100.  Only the edible nest of the Cave Swiftlet  will do, a nest made entirely out of the bird’s saliva. These nests are high in calcium, iron, magnesium and potassium. They are hard when harvested, but partially dissolve into a more jelly-like consistency when boiled into soup.  Harvested nests still sell for as much as $10,000 per kilogram.

Due to the high mineral content of the nests, eating them is believed to enhance lung health, prevents coughs, improve constitution and even promote longevity. The nests are nearly 50 percent protein and 30 percent carbohydrates, with a relatively small amount of inorganic salts and fibre.


Link`s

 


What are your thought`s  let me know in the comments

 


What is Mise en place?

The easy answer is, “everything in its place.” It’s a French phrase meaning that everything is organized and ready…But it is sooo much more!

In the professional kitchen mise en place is more of a philosophy or a way of life rather than just a simple phrase. Mise en place is everything needed to make the shift as smooth as possible. We learn it, we teach it, we get it tattooed on our bodies! As Chef Randy Burns has said, “Mise en place is a state of Mind.” It becomes an integral part of how we think. Whether we are working to implement a new recipe, planning an off-site catered event, or going camping with the family, the philosophy of mise en place infuses our souls with the need to hope for the best and plan for the worst. Everything in its place. A plan for everything.

Proper mise en place means that you are the master of your domain. You know how many covers you should do tonight, you know if it’s a holiday, or if there’s some other special event going on which may impact your covers. If a prep cook does some of your mise then you have verified the quantities and seen where the backups are stored. Trust no one, you verify it yourself.

Mise en Place is defined as:

  • The Ethos of the kitchen

  • So much more than minced shallots

  • Hope for the best, plan for the worst

  • Seconds save minutes

  • The foundation of success

  • The foundation of a successful shift

  • It makes or breaks you

  • A way of life

  • Learn it, know it, live it

  • Prep, Attitude, Focus, Drive

  • Slapping Murphy’s Law into place

  • Telling that bitch Murphy’s Law to sit the fuck down

  • Organisation of product, tools, and mind

  • Seeing and preventing a problem before it arrives


“Mise en Place”; what an exquisite phrase, it slides right off the tongue, effortlessly, like a lightly seared fresh sea scallop drizzled with a rich lemon Beurre Blanc, garnished with a chiffonade of fresh “fine herbs” and shaved truffles…  Seriously, mise en place is the principle, the base, the philosophy that rules every cook’s life; it is a term not just applied to your prepared ingredients, your fridge with prepped meats, your base sauces, stocks, garnishes, etc. ready to assemble; it is your organization, your knowledge, your ability to work with others, (kitchen work is definitely a team activity), your mental ability and preparedness. It is a philosophy; a state of mind! There are so many meanings, connotations and levels of “mise en place” that you’re constantly fine tuning your perception and definition of it. A Cook’s life revolves around “mise en place” and it’s what “makes you, or breaks you”. You’re only as good as your mise en place. It encompasses your prep, cooking, serving, menu design and execution; your ordering, scheduling, managing of the kitchen. The concept of “mise en place” can be applied to virtually any circumstance or scenario. It has taken me years to begin understanding this application to ALL facets of the kitchen, of business, of life; it’s not just my tray with chopped shallots, garlic, various herbs, garnishes, etc. all ready to go into the frying pan ‘ala minute”, it’s applicable to any strategy or action, ; and I’m still learning this every day.

For such a small, eloquent phrase it carries a lot of power, weight and meaning.

Cleanliness/Hygiene and organisation is an integral part of “mise”, they go hand in hand, the sooner you recognise and embrace this fact the further ahead “of the game” you will be.


The Unspoken Laws Of The Kitchen (The Code)